Beacons of Light

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Prince Edward Island, or PEI, is known for its statuesque lighthouses.  The Island is home to 63 lighthouses. With an average of one lighthouse every 34 square miles, the Island has the highest concentration in North America.

 

Cape Bear Lighthouse

Cape Bear lighthouse, built in 1881, and is a typical example of second-generation lighthouse design located on the southeastern tip of PEI. 

Interestingly a gentleman by the name of Thomas Bartlett heard the first distress signal from the Titanic as it sank off Newfoundland in 1912.

Cape Tryon Lighthouse

Perched near the edge of a breathtaking red sandstone cliff proudly stands the Cape Tryon Lighthouse. Built in 1906 this glorious tower guides mariners along the northern coast of PEI between Richmond Bay and New London, warning of the shallow water that extends out a considerable distance from shore.

Lucy Maud Montgomery, author of Anne of Green Gables and numerous other works set on PEI, was living in Cavendish, on the eastern shore of New London Harbour, when Cape Tryon Lighthouse was established.

Montgomery's Anne’s House of Dreams, published in 1909, is set around Four Winds Harbour, in actuality New London Harbour, and features the Four Winds Lighthouse kept by Captain Jim. The following description of the setting of the lighthouse, given in Chapter 9 of the book, leaves little doubt that it was based on Cape Tryon Lighthouse: “The Four Winds light was built on a spur of red sandstone cliff jutting out into the Gulf.”

In May 2016, L.M. Montgomery Land Trust, whose purpose is to preserve the seashore familiar to L.M. Montgomery, became the new owners of the lighthouse.

 Cape Tryon Lighthouse

Cape Tryon Lighthouse

Covehead Lighthouse

Covehead Lighthouse is located among the sand dunes in the PEI National Park. First built in 1967 and later rebuilt in 1975, today it is one of the islands most photographed lighthouses. And it really is no wonder, with its impressive views of the North Shore and square taper tower, symbolic of the Island’s maritime heritage.

Onsite you’ll find a plaque describing the Yankee Gale storm that claimed at least 74 ships and over 150 lives in 1851. 

East Point Lighthouse

East Point Lighthouse is commonly known as Canada’s Confederation Lighthouse having been the only Lighthouse in Canada that was built in 1867 and last year celebrated its 150th birthday. Today this site is still in full operation with onsite tours, a craft shop and café. 

Indian Head Lighthouse

 North Cape Lighthouse

North Cape Lighthouse

Indian Head Lighthouse is 12.9m and is fully octagonal from its concrete base all the way up to its lantern. It was built in 1881 at the end of a long rocky breakwater that was once level enough to be traversed in horse and buggy, but the water has had its way with the rocks and its now too uneven to be safely crossed on foot. Very cautious visitors may access it by rowboat.

North Cape Lighthouse

The need for a North Cape lighthouse was obvious to mariners from as far back as 1534 when Jacques Cartier wrote of the dangerous rocky shoal, the longest shoal in North America. It was built in 1865 and is one of three similar octagonal, wood-framed towers including Seacow Head and Cape Jourimaine lighthouses that are some of the oldest of this style still standing in the Maritimes.

North Rustico Harbour Lighthouse

North Rustico Harbour Lighthouse is a 12.4m wooden structure that stands proudly alongside quaint fishing shacks and the boats that it protects. It is a beloved fixture in this busy fishing community and a reminder to many of the important part this lighthouse has played in guiding vessels through the rough seas.

Panmure Island Lighthouse

Panmure Island Lighthouse is worthy of a postcard all on its own. But it’s made all the more stunning by the gorgeous white sand beach it overlooks and the distant pastures where horses graze. It’s not only the oldest wooden lighthouse on the Island, it has an important legacy guiding vessels through Georgetown and Montague Harbours since 1853.

Point Prim Lighthouse

Point Prim Lighthouse has guided vessels through the southeastern entrance to Hillsborough Bay at the outer approach to Charlottetown Harbour since 1845. Standing 18.2m tall, Point Prim is the oldest lighthouse on the Island and one of only a handful in the country that are made of brick. The harsh weather took a toll on the brick and it had to be shingled just two years after construction.

West Point Lighthouse

Constructed in 1875, West Point, is the Island’s tallest lighthouse. With no shortage of things to do at this location you can easily spend the day here. Explore the pristine beaches, read up on the history at the onsite museum and take home a keepsake from the craft store.

West Point Lighthouse is approximately a 45 minute scenic drive from The Cottage and The Farmhouse.

Mrs. Lighthouse (Carol Livingstone) is a local hero who is closely tied to the Westpoint Lighthouse. Thanks to her dedication, there is a Inn and Restaurant joined to the lighthouse which has ensured the sites survival. To see a short video on her story click here

'We are working today to save yesterday for tomorrow'  
Carol Livingstone (Mrs Lighthouse) 

Wood Islands Lighthouse

Formerly known as Port Woods, Wood Islands lighthouse stands 15.2 m at the entrance to the ferry docks and has been an important navigational aid since 1876.  In 2009, the Wood Islands Lighthouse was uprooted and moved 70 metres (230 feet) inland to ensure its survival. These days the active lighthouse is open for daily tours, along with a craft shop and the Fishery and Coast Guard Museum.